Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen: studie over levens- en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden

Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen studie over levens en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden This classic study of art life and thought in France and the Netherlands during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries ranks as one of the most perceptive analyses of the medieval period A brilliant

  • Title: Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen: studie over levens- en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden
  • Author: Johan Huizinga A. van der Lem
  • ISBN: 9789025427801
  • Page: 246
  • Format: Paperback
  • This classic study of art, life, and thought in France and the Netherlands during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries ranks as one of the most perceptive analyses of the medieval period A brilliantly creative work that established the reputation of Dutch historian John Huizinga 1872 1945 , the book argues that the era of diminishing chivalry reflected the spirit of anThis classic study of art, life, and thought in France and the Netherlands during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries ranks as one of the most perceptive analyses of the medieval period A brilliantly creative work that established the reputation of Dutch historian John Huizinga 1872 1945 , the book argues that the era of diminishing chivalry reflected the spirit of an age and that its figures and events were neither a prelude to the Renaissance nor harbingers of a coming culture, but a consummation of the old.Among other topics, the author examines the violent tenor of medieval life, the idea of chivalry, the conventions of love, religious life, the vision of death, the symbolism that pervaded medieval life, and aesthetic sentiment We view the late Middle Ages through the psychology and thought of artists, theologians, poets, court chroniclers, princes, and statesmen of the period, witnessing the splendor and simplicity of medieval life, its courtesy and cruelty, its idyllic vision of life, despair and mysticism, religious, artistic, and practical life, and much .Long regarded as a landmark of historical scholarship, The Waning of the Middle Ages is also a remarkable work of literature Of its author, the New York Times said, Professor Huizinga has dressed his imposing and variegated assemblage of facts in the colorful garments characteristic of novels, and he parades them from his first page to the last in a vivid style An international success following its original publication in 1919 and subsequently translated into several languages, The Waning of the Middle Ages will not only serve as an invaluable reference for students and scholars of medieval history but will also appeal to general readers and anyone fascinated by life during the Middle Ages.

    • Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen: studie over levens- en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden BY Johan Huizinga A. van der Lem
      246 Johan Huizinga A. van der Lem
    • thumbnail Title: Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen: studie over levens- en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden BY Johan Huizinga A. van der Lem
      Posted by:Johan Huizinga A. van der Lem
      Published :2019-07-21T08:04:53+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen: studie over levens- en gedachtenvormen der veertiende en vijftiende eeuw in Frankrijk en de Nederlanden

    1. Johan Huizinga was a Dutch historian and one of the founders of modern cultural history.

    2. Bought this by mistake thinking it was a book by Burckhardt, which was obviously pretty stupid as it clearly says Huizinga on the cover. But The Waning of the Middle Ages had been on my mind to read for some time(view spoiler)[ which is what I use in place of a reading wish list, the fallibility of human memory helps by winnowing down the near infinite possibilities of reading to something more humanly achievable (hide spoiler)] so I surrendered to the serendipity.The book is an attempt to creat [...]

    3. This is a really difficult book for me to review. This is one of the first books that I ever read concerning medieval history, and it had quite a big impact on me, so Autumn of the Middle Ages is always going to have a special place in my heart. It's a really lovely book, beautifully written, and Huizinga makes genuinely fantastic use of stories and anecdotes. It's also full of some very good insights into medieval culture and it acts as a nice corrective to history books that rely solely on adm [...]

    4. Nearly a century has passed since this book was written, and if you're feeling a bit nostalgic, or just curmudgeonly, you might want to read Waning of the Middle Ages in juxtaposition with a more modern history--especially one published by an academic press. You might conclude that we're waning a bit ourselves.Huizinga's history is poetic and evocative. It will take you back to a time when histories were still literature, not yet beaten down by the forces of overspecialization, politicization, a [...]

    5. I am not nearly enough of a historian to rate this book as overall correct or incorrect. My understanding of the study of history is to take many interpretations of learned historians into account and weigh them with the evidence. Is this source a bit dated? Of course it is -- it is nearly a hundred years old. But Huizinga's voice is lively and engaging. His erudition is great enough that he is allowed to have some sweeping opinions. He gives a very interesting perspective on this era and region [...]

    6. (Apologies for the grumpy review -- but I'll let it stand. Future readers should read the comment section, which has more value than my current hrrruumphs!)This book is too long and there is much too much of the author's psycho-social speculation in it - some of it is fairly good, a little of it is quite useless, and very, very little of it is absolutely essential or compelling. The abundant and detailed evidence collected and adduced throughout this volume, on the other hand, is by far the best [...]

    7. Huizinga's work is a classic look at the literary and artistic culture of fifteenth century Burgundy and France. His thesis is basically that the literature and art of the ages reveals that a culture in decay, ripened to the point where its cultural "forms" (an idea he never defines exactly) have overgrown the ideas they were meant to convey. Huizinga believed that the boundary between what we call the Renaissance and the Middle Ages was porous, something that scholars today seem to accept for t [...]

    8. In his histroiograhical tour of middle ages scholarship, Norman F. Cantor puts Huiznga in his "outriders" section at the back of the book. While he candidly acknowledges the populairty of the "waning of the middle ages" among undergraduates, he takes issue with Huizinga's scholarship. I think Cantor does Huzinga a disservice, for I found "Autumn" to be eye opening both for its adept analysis and its innovative method. Huzingia is a fore runner of later developments in social history, both in Fra [...]

    9. Spending time browsing through "Great Books" lists tends to turn up classics like this one, and since my knowledge of the Middle Ages was scant at best, I thought I'd give this older classic (published in 1924) a try. I was pleasantly surprised at Huizinga's writing style, which for the most part was quite interesting and engaging. His history largely covered France and the Netherlands, and dealt with a variety of characteristics of the 14th and 15th centuries; topics such as chivalry, vows, lov [...]

    10. The subtitle presents the correct focus: no overview of political or military facts (also no economic), but an excursion into the various aspects of the late-medieval mental attitudes. The focus is not on philosophy and religion, though on the ideals that lay on the surface: the Knight-ideal, the codes of honour, courtly love, the sense of reality, and so on.Critical remarks: it's too one-sided based on narrative sources, focus on elites (but could he otherwise?), especially the French model (ra [...]

    11. The abbreviated version, purportedly translated from the German edition and truncated because Huizinga believed that Americans wouldn't understand the complete version, Be that as it may, I have read both this and the later complete translation (from the Dutch) and the important argument is here. Huizinga believed that in the late 14th and early 15th century the Mediaval faith had become ritualistic and overly ripe. The Western world was ready for something new, i. e the Renaissance. Relying hea [...]

    12. First of all, I would like to thank Bertrand Russell for inspiring me to read this book. He found Huizinga's reflections on the evolution of Western culture from the Medieval mindset to that of the Renaissance an aid in understanding his own experience of the rise of Modernism and the roots of its rejection in the horror of the Great War (World War I). I found it similarly interesting for my own experience of the transition from the Late Modernism of my childhood to the early Postmodernism of my [...]

    13. This is a really difficult book for me to review. This is one of the first books that I ever read concerning medieval history, and it had quite a big impact on me, so Autumn of the Middle Ages is always going to have a special place in my heart. It's a really lovely book, beautifully written, and Huizinga makes genuinely fantastic use of stories and anecdotes. It's also full of some very good insights into medieval culture and it acts as a nice corrective to history books that rely solely on adm [...]

    14. I could not finish this book, I just could not. In Dutch there is a word perfect to describe my sentiment; woordenbrij; roughly translated as mess of words. I will not claim that the book is bad or wrong but the style of writing was just not my cup to tea and every chapter I got lost in the words. The problem is that this is a book nearly a hundred years old in a style nearly incomprehensible for a contemporary reader. I am a history major and I still could not immediately place every historical [...]

    15. It's difficult to balance the merits of this book against its faults. Aesthetically, it is a masterpiece, and anyone who enjoys reading history as literature regardless of its methodological rigor should not fail to read Huizinga's work. Surely one reason this book is so popular among teachers and students is that it masterfully conveys a mood of this particular era, treading a fine line between familiarity and strangeness.I felt that the earlier chapters of this book aged better than the latter [...]

    16. A classic look at the final flowering of medieval culture--- a world alien in so many ways, yet whose obsessions seem all-too-familiar. The focus here is on northern France and the Low Countries, but Huizinga's vision is wide-ranging and informed. Even after so long, this is a key book for examining Western Europe between the Black Death and the Reformation. Beautifully written, and presented here in a new rendering that's far closer to the original text than the standard English version of "The [...]

    17. This was a college book. I'd experience life as a fairy-story of young love like Maid Marian and Robin with dreams of living in the woods. This book exposed the "vehement pathos "of medieval life. Though there were princes and unicorns I learned there was a lot of cruelty along with the tenderness of life. I later learned of similar horrors of the renaissance but was able to live in my own movie when I I found other anachronists and joined the SCA.

    18. Severely dated, conceptually stunted, and deeply methodologically flawed. Burckhardtian in its attempt to capture the "mood" of the late middle ages, but based on a number of false premises (primarily, that the Renaissance was in any way secular, and that it lacked continuity with the culture of the middle ages, which apparently decayed and actually went away entirely) that add up to a distorted and unhistorical picture of the era.

    19. La malinconica ferocia di un mondo al tramonto. Ideali, canzoni d'amore, tornei dove sovrani veri giocano con i simboli di un passato immaginato.Un grande libro, un intramontabile classico della storiografia del primo novecento. Si legge come un romanzo perchè in ogni parola risuona l'amore dell'autore per il passato fiammeggiante di un paese scomparso dai libri di storia

    20. One of the most remarkable history books in the Dutch language, covering the Middle Ages in France and the Netherlands first published in 1919 and this copy is at its 16th printing about 65 years later.

    21. SUL MEDIOEVO IN SE'L'immagine che Huizinga restituisce del Basso Medioevo (1300-1400) è l'immagine di un'epoca che sta declinando. O, meglio, che è in un momento - si fa per dire, sono duecento anni - di stasi culturale: il pensiero si è ormai ormai compiuto e sviluppato, così come l'arte e la società. Si assiste, quindi, a una sorta di ristagno e svuotamento dei contenuti, rimangono solo delle forme più o meno ripetute all'infinito. In particolare, il pensiero medioevale, caratterizzato d [...]

    22. "Que tipo de ideia podemos formar de uma época se não olharmos para as pessoas que a viveram? Se oferecermos explicações generalizantes, criaremos apenas um deserto e chamaremos isso de história."Não posso deixar de comentar essa edição da Cosac Naify, desde o papel, a capa, a qualidade da impressão, tudo nela é muito bem acabado. A diagramação é um trabalho primoroso. A parte física da obra acaba adicionando imensamente à leitura.Como leigo, acredito que não aproveitei a obra co [...]

    23. Lang ernaar uitgezien om dit standaardwerk te lezen over de Middeleeuwen. Ik had eerder een academisch historisch werk verwacht, maar eerder via beschrijvingen en indrukken tracht de auteur de lezer een beeld te geven van het leven tijdens deze onderbelichte periode: de felheid van het leven (honger, weelde,), het ridderideaal met de hoofse liefde, het idyllische beeld van het leven, de steeds aanwezige schaduw van de dood, de rol van de godsdienst en zijn heiligen.Omwille van het verouderd taal [...]

    24. skimmed it & found it a bit too general for my purposes - i'm sure it could be a good intro for someone else, though

    25. Having read a couple of texts on the last years before the renaissance in Europe it was amusing to find a book that considers that it only occurred in France. The Italians no doubt have a thing or two to say about that! He verbosely attempts to cover all aspects of the times and sadly ends up miring the reader in a psychological mishmash.Those are hours I won't be getting back

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