Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man

Hack Attack How the Truth Caught Up with the World s Most Powerful Man The definitive book on the phone hacking scandal from the journalist who broke the biggest story of corruption since WatergateAt first it seemed like a small story A royal correspondent for the News

  • Title: Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man
  • Author: Nick Davies
  • ISBN: 9780865478817
  • Page: 369
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The definitive book on the phone hacking scandal from the journalist who broke the biggest story of corruption since WatergateAt first, it seemed like a small story A royal correspondent for the News of the World was caught listening to the voice mail messages of staff at Buckingham Palace He and a private investigator went to prison for three months But Nick Davies, aThe definitive book on the phone hacking scandal from the journalist who broke the biggest story of corruption since WatergateAt first, it seemed like a small story A royal correspondent for the News of the World was caught listening to the voice mail messages of staff at Buckingham Palace He and a private investigator went to prison for three months But Nick Davies, a journalist at The Guardian, knew it didn t add up A source at the News of the World told him that not only was hacking routine, but live phone calls were being listened to Trojan e mails were being sent bribes were paid to the police houses were broken into Davies spent the next four years uncovering the truth, and in July 2009, he broke the first big story Rupert Murdoch s U.K company had secretly paid 1 million to silence three people whose lawyer proved that the News of the World had hacked into their voice mail Davies s story quoted police sources admitting that there had in fact been thousands of victims No other newspaper picked up the story, and News International retaliated with all of their resources Hack Attack is Davies s mesmerizing account of his battle to prove the truth, describing how politicians who dared to stand up to Murdoch were punished by his journalists how the lawyers who sued Murdoch were spied on how public figures who went to court found their careers threatened Hack Attack is a blow by blow account of the fall of an international media empire, by the lone journalist who dared to fight it.

    • Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man by Nick Davies
      369 Nick Davies
    • thumbnail Title: Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man by Nick Davies
      Posted by:Nick Davies
      Published :2019-08-08T23:47:05+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man

    1. Nick Davies Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man book, this is one of the most wanted Nick Davies author readers around the world.

    2. Freedom of the press and freedom of speech are such fundamental cornerstones in the foundations of democracy that it becomes an affront and outrage to the principles by which we live and are Governed when the Fourth Estate abuses its protections and priviledged position in undermining the very Democracy that vests so much trust and empowerment in it. Nick Davies' account of the systemic abuse by the Murdock Tabloid press of that trust as revealed by the hacking scandals is not so much a tale of [...]

    3. This is a book about power.Some investigative journalism is involved, but as Davies points out early in piece, his inquiries were not a Watergate-style mystery chase. Clear evidence indicating that sustained phone hacking had taken place at the News of the World and other publications was there in the public record, following it up wasn't a matter of hunting down unlisted numbers and working dead drops with mystery sources but one of forcing the Metropolitan Police to release the mountain of inc [...]

    4. Don't miss the epilogue of this book. For those of us who followed the phone hacking scandal from the beginning, this was a great overview and a blow by blow rapid-fire account of how it started, developed into the biggest scandal in British journalism, and how it ended. It is also a fascinating study in determination on the part of the author, who broke the story originally and who followed it through despite having a full case-load of other stories to write. Nick Davies is the writer who broug [...]

    5. First five-star review of 2016.A riveting account of how one journalist from the Guardian dared to take on News Corp, one of the world's biggest media conglomerates and expose the wrongdoings of its British tabloid "News of the World", later known as the 'phone-hacking scandal'.A brilliant work of investigative journalism that deserves to be read. Highly recommended.

    6. just closed Nick Davies’ “Hack Attack.” It’s the account of the ten year battle to finally bring to light the role of Rupert Murdoch’s News International organisation in using illegal means to acquire information; the way the organisation deliberately attacked individuals and their families if an individual dared to protest their behaviour; how News International created a climate in which neither police, regulators nor politicians dared tackle their corruption because the consequences [...]

    7. “It’s fair to say that reporting is a great deal easier than most reporters like to pretend. People tell you things; you do your best to check them out; and then you tell a lot of other people what you’ve found. There are some hidden subtleties in there and a few simple skills, but generally speaking, there is nothing very clever about it.” is how Nick Davies describes his craft.It’s important to note just how vitally important this book and other books like it are, especially in the c [...]

    8. A true and honest account of blackmail, intimidation, malice, invasion of privacy and toxic falsehood. We know it's a nasty, selfish and crooked world at times, but when those who practise such malice, bullying and corruption have such a strangle hold on our police and our politicians we should become concernedry concerned. Guardian journalist, Nick Davies has written a gripping account of his David and Goliath struggle with Rupert Murdoch and the Fleet Street hacks. Davies claims only a pyrrhic [...]

    9. A true and honest account of blackmail, intimidation, malice, invasion of privacy and toxic falsehood. We know it's a nasty, selfish and crooked world at times, but when those who practise such malice, bullying and corruption have such a strangle hold on our police and our politicians we should become concernedry concerned. Guardian journalist, Nick Davies has written a gripping account of his David and Goliath struggle with Rupert Murdoch and the Fleet Street hacks. Davies claims only a pyrrhic [...]

    10. Davies' narrative jumped around a lot and, while interesting at first, got rather tedious after a while. It was sad to see the dishonesty among news organizations and the financially powerful. I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised, and I guess I wasn't (entirely), but it was still sad.It didn't take too long to note that the political right were the bad guys and the political left the good guys. I thought it interesting that when someone's illegal and/or immoral actions were exposed by Murdo [...]

    11. "So it was that a whole generation of English men and women were told that they should lose the welfare state and the trade unions and the protective laws for which their ancestors had fought and the balance of power should be tipped backwards by a century and more, because this would make them free; and, in case they hesitated for a moment and questioned the idea that the wealthy elite would know and care more about their welfare than their own parents and grandparents, they were also offered a [...]

    12. Five stars both for Nick Davies' excellent work on this story (the most shocking revelation of which is that people who aren't on Seinfeld actually use voicemail), and for the book, which does a great job of making a long and complicated series of trials and inquiries involving several Dunbar numbers of players pacy and clear. A bonus is the unexpectedly hardboiled language Davies occasionally uses (chasing leads "from hell to breakfast"), and the revelation that he worked on the story while gal [...]

    13. Nick Davies, the reporter who first broke the hacking scandal in the UK, tells the story of his experience in this page-turner of a book. Though I wished he'd talked more about the implications of the scandal in terms of privacy rights and freedom (both of individuals, and of the government to function without interference from power-brokers), it's an eye-opener. And though this particular story happened in Britain, it certainly made me consider the role the media--and particularly Murdoch and c [...]

    14. Many of us followed the hacking scandal in fits and starts, as it unfolded in the media. Here, Nick Davies, who was instrumental in exposing what was going on, brings the story together, and tells us what the papers and the BBC didn't tell us. It's riveting and very disturbing stuff, about the power of a media mogul to destroy democracy. The epilogue is a brilliant summary of neoliberalism.

    15. Great commentary on power, press, and the Murdochs. Found myself skimming the long-ish sections about minutiae of the investigations and prosecutions -- they are necessary additions to document for history, but not terribly compelling for the reader. Davies is at his best when he steps back and analyses his industry.

    16. Interesting at times, but basically boring. The worst of journalism on display. But what else is new? Won this book from .

    17. Extremely detailed. This would be a fascinating textbook 'auxiliary read' for journalism students.

    18. I found it a little hard going to get through the book, but I felt compelled to read it all the way through. I felt it a duty to inform myself of the conduct, or rather misconduct of the media and the incredible influence they have had with the police and politicians. This kind of conduct effects all of us and I think it’s important to be well informed. Especially after the risks the author went to, to expose the situation.

    19. A fascinating read about the thirst for power a huge media entity had and the absolute invincibility they felt. On the other side, a great lesson in perseverance by a reporter to chase the story and not be intimidated. However, this book is so detailed and that it gets confusing by the way it's laid out because it seems to jump around. Would read much better if it stuck to the timeline.

    20. Fascinating and made me very "indignant of Winchester"!Let's hope that the Daniel Morgan Independent Inquiry Panel will be as successful as the Hillsborough one.Am never buying any Murdoch media again.

    21. Whilst undeniably an interesting and notable event in British politics relating to the Freedom of the press and corruption, Hack Attack is probably Davies' least engaging book from a reading perspective.

    22. This is a riveting and forensic investigation of the hacking scandal . The detail is mind boggling and Nick Davies and the Guardian were relentless in uncovering the extent of the phone hacking which involved all and sundry and was first uncovered in relation to the Royal family and was dismissed as the work of a couple of rogue reporters . In fact this was the tip of a very large iceberg .The key point of course was when it was discovered that Millie Downer's phone had been hacked into . No one [...]

    23. Hack Attack is Nick Davies'account how he spent years researching the full truth of the phone hacking scandal. He exposes the obfuscations, cover ups and outright lies not just by News of the World and News International (Murdoch's UK arm of his media company) but also those in the police, politics and even the Department of Prosecution.On the surface it's a crime story. One of criminal behaviour and and the attempt to cover it all up. And that alone makes compelling reading But beneath that is [...]

    24. At one point Alan Rusbridger, Davies' editor at The Guardian, is quoted as describing the events of this book as being like “living in a Stieg Larsson novel, full of endless plots and dark machinations”.The story is certainly as complex, but unfortunately Davies doesn’t tell it as well as Larsson. Occasionally he hits his stride, and everything flows well, but having everything largely emerge in chronological order just didn’t work for me. For people who have had continuous exposure to t [...]

    25. Murdered girls, the parents of those murdered girls, the families of military officers killed on duty - these were among the many who had their phones hacked by the News of the World, the Rupert Murdoch-owned newspaper which presided over not just one of the largest abdications of journalistic integrity by a media outlet but, as Nick Davies sets out in rollicking yet appalling detail, a flourishing criminal enterprise aided and abetted by those tasked with the job of taking down such criminals. [...]

    26. Should Newspapers report the news, or should they make it? And if they do either, to what lengths can they go to achieve that elusive exclusive? Bribery? Blackmail? Murder?These are the fundamental questions explored in Nick Davies' stunning book "Hack Attack: How the Truth Caught Up with the World's Most Powerful Man". The powerful man in question is Rupert Murdoch Chairman of News International, who holds a Bond villain influence over the World's leadership. In fact, the Bond villain Eliot Car [...]

    27. "We go out and destroy other people's lives." --Tabloid editor Greg Miskiw, trying to cheer up a junior reporter who had to dress as Harry Potter as part of a publicity stuntAccount of the phone-hacking scandal by one of the first and most bulldog-like reporters to cover it. As usual, the cover-up is worse than the crime. Listening in on the personal phone messages of celebrities and royals is reprehensible, but the true scandal was that police officers repeatedly accepted bribes -- and Scotland [...]

    28. Davies has written a book that is thoroughly depressing for all the right reasons. As he makes clear at the end of his story, although some of the personnel have changed, the power of the multinational Murdoch empire remains as strong as ever. Even so, there is some satisfaction in reading about the corrupt practices of the newspapers, the police and the politicians getting a full public exposure. What makes tale all the more impressive is the author having not run afoul of the stringent English [...]

    29. If I could give this book 10 stars I would. I started it at 5.00 p.m. yesterday and finally finished it at 3.00 a.m. this morning. I could not put it down. Every time I thought I will just read to the end of the chapter something would come up and I would think well I will just read a few more pages to see how this goes. Without a doubt the most shocking evidence of the control that the wealthy have over our governments, our political systems and the corruption and cooperation at all levels. For [...]

    30. Hack Attack is an incredibly insight into how the world of politics, journalism and crime mix to create one of the biggest newspaper scandals. I found it very interesting to read a comprehensive vie won the entire story, and how it developed over time, and learning about the players behind the scenes - not something you would necessarily get from the newspaper coverage at the time.For example, who would have thought that Max Mosley paid for the legal bills of various people suing the News of the [...]

    31. Spaghetti! A book too full of facts & data. No doubt the author can be considered an expert on the subject, but he fails badly in presenting it in an organised manner, in a manner that an outsider would completely understand the gravity of the matter. Often, I couldn't shake the image that the author is exactly the same as the subjects he so loaths : a journalist out to score points, no matter what. I don't know what is fact and what is fiction in this case, but I often had the impression th [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *