Damballah

Damballah This collection of interrelated stories spans the history of Homewood a Pittsburgh community founded by a runaway slave With stunning lyricism Wideman sings of dead children in garbage cans of gosp

  • Title: Damballah
  • Author: John Edgar Wideman
  • ISBN: 9780395897973
  • Page: 356
  • Format: Paperback
  • This collection of interrelated stories spans the history of Homewood, a Pittsburgh community founded by a runaway slave With stunning lyricism, Wideman sings of dead children in garbage cans, of gospel and basketball, of lost gods and dead fathers John Leonard It is a celebration of people who, in the face of crisis, uphold one another with grace, courage, and dignThis collection of interrelated stories spans the history of Homewood, a Pittsburgh community founded by a runaway slave With stunning lyricism, Wideman sings of dead children in garbage cans, of gospel and basketball, of lost gods and dead fathers John Leonard It is a celebration of people who, in the face of crisis, uphold one another with grace, courage, and dignity.

    • Damballah BY John Edgar Wideman
      356 John Edgar Wideman
    • thumbnail Title: Damballah BY John Edgar Wideman
      Posted by:John Edgar Wideman
      Published :2019-04-03T13:37:51+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Damballah

    1. A widely celebrated writer and the winner of many literary awards, he is the first to win the International PEN Faulkner Award twice in 1984 for Sent for You Yesterday and in 1990 for Philadelphia Fire In 2000 he won the O Henry Award for his short story Weight , published in The Callaloo Journal.In March, 2010, he self published Briefs, a new collection of microstories, on Lulu Stories from the book have already been selected for the O Henry Prize for 2010 and the Best African American Fiction 2010 award His nonfiction book Brothers and Keepers received a National Book Award He grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA and much of his writing is set there, especially in the Homewood neighborhood of the East End He graduated from Pittsburgh s Peabody High School, then attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he became an All Ivy League forward on the basketball team He was the second African American to win a Rhodes Scholarship New College, Oxford University, England , graduating in 1966 He also graduated from the University of Iowa Writers Workshop.Critics Circle nomination, and his memoir Fatheralong was a finalist for the National Book Award He is also the recipient of a MacArthur genius grant Wideman was chosen as winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story in 1998, for outstanding achievement in that genre In 1997, his novel The Cattle Killing won the James Feni Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction.He has taught at the University of Wyoming, University of Pennsylvania, where he founded and chaired the African American Studies Department, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst s MFA Program for Poets Writers He currently teaches at Brown University, and he sits on the contributing editorial board of the literary journal Conjunctions.

    2. This is another installment of the Homewood Series and worth reading. The novel begins on a plantation and ends with some of the original settlers of Homewood. The bulk of the novel is an exploration of the Wideman family through oral folklore. The narrators change, usually the person in question narrates their own story, covering a long timeline and many aspects of the family. We are first introduced to Orion, a slave, who is decapitated for exposing himself to the mistress of the house. John F [...]

    3. These are sad, hard stories about different members of an African American family extended across at least six generations. The style is modernist and literary - understated, often oblique, but conveying great weights of loss, suffering, and the enduring experience of poverty and racial injustice. What makes it particularly hard to read is the knowledge that many of the stories are informed by the history of Wideman's real-world family. It's not at all clear in this book whether the arc of histo [...]

    4. it is poetry put into a story and the characters frightenly real. there is no actual plot but a collection of short stories that make up themes. I did not understand all ofbthe connections but for some reason that was nh favorite part cause it was nice to read something that was so unique I could not predict the characters or the themes but I had to think bout them and reread sections tip they made sense. I really loved the book, but be prepared for language and content. the nature of the book i [...]

    5. I come to this book as a ghost. I read it for my postmodern American literature class, and frankly, did not understand some of it. However, what I did understand, the importance of remembering the dead, storytelling, and family, comes across beautifully in Wideman's work. As he explores the idea of forging ties to the lost, African American past, Wideman creates an incredible microcosm, Homewood. I highly recommend this book, as well as the documentary "Jack Johnson: Unforgivable Blackness." Bot [...]

    6. I really enjoyed this book. It's basically a collage of stories of a family that is the offspring of a runaway slave. All the stories seem to be dealing with how to keep faith in God and goodness in the face of a world where everything is confusing and finding a purpose is never fully possible. Very spiritually-enlightening. Loved it.

    7. Difficult to read, and discouraging except for the doggedly-determined. Wideman does a great job of interweaving the lives of Homewood's citizens, as well as incorporating his own life's experiences into the stories.

    8. I loved his lyrical prose, deeply human characters, and strong sense of place. Homewood was vividly created, and I appreciated its small but important victories in the midst of desperation and decay.

    9. Wideman focuses on lyrical phrasing as he weaves his stories about childhood stories from his home town. Beautifully crafted.

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