The Cattle Killing

The Cattle Killing In plague ridden eighteenth century Philadelphia a young itinerant black preacher searches for a mysterious endangered African woman His struggle to find her and save them both plummets them both in

  • Title: The Cattle Killing
  • Author: John Edgar Wideman
  • ISBN: 9780395877500
  • Page: 485
  • Format: Paperback
  • In plague ridden eighteenth century Philadelphia, a young itinerant black preacher searches for a mysterious, endangered African woman His struggle to find her and save them both plummets them both into the nightmare of a society violently splitting itself into white and black Spiraling outward from the core image of a cattle killing the Xhosa people s ritual destructioIn plague ridden eighteenth century Philadelphia, a young itinerant black preacher searches for a mysterious, endangered African woman His struggle to find her and save them both plummets them both into the nightmare of a society violently splitting itself into white and black Spiraling outward from the core image of a cattle killing the Xhosa people s ritual destruction of their herd in a vain attempt to resist European domination the novel expands its narrator s search for meaning and love into the America, Europe and South Africa of yesterday and today.

    • The Cattle Killing « John Edgar Wideman
      485 John Edgar Wideman
    • thumbnail Title: The Cattle Killing « John Edgar Wideman
      Posted by:John Edgar Wideman
      Published :2019-07-24T07:45:55+00:00

    2 thoughts on “The Cattle Killing

    1. A widely celebrated writer and the winner of many literary awards, he is the first to win the International PEN Faulkner Award twice in 1984 for Sent for You Yesterday and in 1990 for Philadelphia Fire In 2000 he won the O Henry Award for his short story Weight , published in The Callaloo Journal.In March, 2010, he self published Briefs, a new collection of microstories, on Lulu Stories from the book have already been selected for the O Henry Prize for 2010 and the Best African American Fiction 2010 award His nonfiction book Brothers and Keepers received a National Book Award He grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA and much of his writing is set there, especially in the Homewood neighborhood of the East End He graduated from Pittsburgh s Peabody High School, then attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he became an All Ivy League forward on the basketball team He was the second African American to win a Rhodes Scholarship New College, Oxford University, England , graduating in 1966 He also graduated from the University of Iowa Writers Workshop.Critics Circle nomination, and his memoir Fatheralong was a finalist for the National Book Award He is also the recipient of a MacArthur genius grant Wideman was chosen as winner of the Rea Award for the Short Story in 1998, for outstanding achievement in that genre In 1997, his novel The Cattle Killing won the James Feni Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction.He has taught at the University of Wyoming, University of Pennsylvania, where he founded and chaired the African American Studies Department, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst s MFA Program for Poets Writers He currently teaches at Brown University, and he sits on the contributing editorial board of the literary journal Conjunctions.

    2. Okay, I give up. I can't get through Wideman's novel. All the right ingredients are here - the stream of consciousness writing, the postmodern narrative within a narrative, black suffering and religious faith, slavery and an African past But I'm not hooked. Plus I owe so many overdue fines on the novel at this point

    3. This is another one of those novels that seems to require two readings in order for me to truly appreciate the richness in the text. My first read through, I was lost. I recognized the prose's beauty, but like a subject dislocated by the effects of the diaspora, I found myself experiencing blips of disjointed scenes that ebb in the wake of the slave ship. Wideman's work is a critique of White Christianity, a testimony on the queer nature of time as it relates to narrative and post-colonialism, a [...]

    4. I'm not particularly smart, so its very possible that this was just way over my head. But I was lost for about 60 - 70% of this book. Certain 5-10 page stretches were extremely evocative and powerful.

    5. Sometime in the eighteenth century, the Xhosa people of South Africa followed the advice of an early-day intelligence report--an oracle--and began destroying their cattle in the belief that the slaughter would help them avoid European domination. The killing of their number one means of sustenance proved even more self-destructive than our own flocking to follow pied pipers Rumsfeld, Cheney, and Bush. At least so far.Richard Wideman’s The Cattle Killing uses this historical event as a metaphor [...]

    6. I discovered a whole cache of this guy's books at Caliban Books (amazing book store) in Pittsburgh. He's from there. I kept reading the descriptions on the books and knew instantly I had found a new beloved author. I wanted to buy all of the books, but I only bought one, for both financial purposes and because I hadn't actually read any of his work yet.Turns out this book was infuriating. People love him, so I can only chalk up my misery while reading this book to being dumb. I didn't understand [...]

    7. Would someone who gave this book 4 or 5 stars please explain it -- or why -- to me? I feel like I'm missing something, but not really. I don't ever expect to understand Wideman's work completely when I read it, but what I have been so moved by in the past was the intensely personal way he writes. I mean, I loved Philadelphia Fire mainly because of the parts where it seemed to be Wideman talking. It is as though the backdrops of his novels -- the house firebombing, the Xhosa cattle killing, the y [...]

    8. A dream-like narrative woven of memory and history across time, connecting American slavery, the Xhosa Cattle Killing, and an itinerant storytelling man. The creative incorporation of the Xhosa Cattle Killing was especially impressive, and it makes one wonder how Zakes Mda's The Heart of Redness (probably the best known fictional account of the Cattle Killing) might have taken greater literary license with historical accounts.

    9. Nobody writes like Wideman. He's a master. If I had to compare him to another writer it would probably be Cormac McCarthy but even that's a stretch. If you want to read something mind-expanding then read either "The Cattle Killing" or "Philadelphia Fire," the two Wideman I've read. He's completely unique and very compelling.

    10. This is a fine book, which reminds me of the style of Henry Miller in some waysifting, flowing, not keenly organized. It's almost poetry in places, and it touches and lays bare some festering wounds in our society. It's a good read, but one has to rise above the complete and total lack of the use of question marks and other stylistic liberties.

    11. first read this in college and have come back to it several times. one of the greatest pieces of fiction i've ever read.

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