To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938

To Live and to Write Selections by Japanese Women Writers Presents selections by nine leading women writers from Japan spanning twenty five years of change and emerging feminist consciousness in that country

  • Title: To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938
  • Author: Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta
  • ISBN: 9780931188435
  • Page: 388
  • Format: Paperback
  • Presents selections by nine leading women writers from Japan, spanning twenty five years of change and emerging feminist consciousness in that country.

    • To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938 By Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta
      388 Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta
    • thumbnail Title: To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938 By Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta
      Posted by:Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta
      Published :2019-04-05T13:36:51+00:00

    2 thoughts on “To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938

    1. Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta says:

      Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the To Live and to Write: Selections by Japanese Women Writers, 1913-1938 book, this is one of the most wanted Yukiko Tanaka Elizabeth Hanson Hiroko M. Malatesta author readers around the world.

    2. Little by little like stinging currents, streams of piercing pain scurried all over my back. Sullen fingers cringing at the mere sight of fluttering pages, drowsy eyelids succumbing to the warpath of the recurring prose and the poor chair cumbersome under my weight. I wasn't yet ready to let go the book. The faint sound of a nib impregnated by flowing ink scribbling over the coarseness of paper filled the clammy air in my room; women writing to emancipate their souls, women writing to feed their [...]

    3. Like any collection of short stories, essays, etc by various authors some of these were better than others. All were at least interesting, if not better. And the breadth of the collection meant that one came away with a very good sense of what it was like to be a woman in Japan in those times. Many of the stories were about women writers trying to pursue a career in that field. Not only were they poor, they often had husbands/lovers who treated them badly, and parents who were not sympathetic or [...]

    4. This was an interesting read for me. I think the best part was seeing literary trends from a time before I was born written for a culture I'm not part of. These women writers became prominent in a time when each and every one of them were unlikely to succeed just because they were women. Seeing the themes they wrote about and many of the stories being at least semi-autobiographical makes me feel like I've learned at least a little bit more about both what it meant to be a Japanese women in this [...]

    5. This book was incredible. Each story spoke of the writers' strength and endurance through supremely difficult times, and I ate it up. These women conquered poverty, hunger, censorship, and patriarchy to write beautiful, destructive, and soul-punching words. Simply put: these ladies are SO FREAKING HARDCORE, DUDE.I read this book to research for a short story, and I wasn't disappointed. Each short story is preceded with a mini-biography of the author, so now I have pages of notes in my notebook a [...]

    6. This is an amazing jewel of a book. I don't even remember how I found it, but I've recommended it broadly ever since. The stories about these Japanese women writers suffering for the art will break your heart, and make you feel foolish for ever complaining about your writing life. They're not particularly joyous stories, instead they are heartbreakingly real, and unforgettable.

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